Blood is thicker than water, they say. Thank God.

It is good that family ties can weather many storms.

Who would not understand Isaac’s fury when he discovered that he had been deceived by his brother?

But had he not known that in letting Jacob have his birth-right he was agreeing to him having the blessings also? Some things are linked and we need to be aware of the consequences of linked actions.

It’s like, I was telling my congregation yesterday, seeking God’s forgiveness implies a readiness to forgive others, if we take Jesus’ lessons seriously. We cannot have one without the other. But oh so often., we think we can undo linkages with the snap of a finger.

The mother who helped Jacob to cheat his brother, had sufficient experience to know that blood often gets thicker than water, if we allow it time to thicken. So she sent him to hide by his uncle Laban until such time as it was possible to appease the one whom he cheated.

Oh how furious Esau had become. He had been cheated. But this did not come without his carelessness earlier on. Poor thing, without any prompting, he made his father’s favourite stew and brought it to him, hoping to get a blessing. But that blessing had already been pronounced on a cheat! Wow! He sought to get even.

But his mother knew something. She knew that in due time, the brothers could be reconciled.

Now therefore, my son, obey my voice; flee at once to my brother Laban in Haran, 44 and stay with him a while, until your brother’s fury turns away— 4until your brother’s anger against you turns away, and he forgets what you have done to him; then I will send, and bring you back from there. Why should I lose both of you in one day?”

It was going to work.

After the hurt is done, don’t expect your wrongs to be instantly forgotten. Reconciliation may need planning. Healing takes time.

Thank you, Lord for your plan to forgive the consequences of our errors. Help us to claim your pardon. Enable us to wait on those whom we have wronged, to wait on your time, that they will pardon us too, if we seek reconciliation.

About Joan Delsol Meade

Unashamedly Christian, though not a Christian imperialist. A Dominican from Montserrat, Caribbean woman, home maker, pastor and community builder. Child advocate and sponsor

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